Protecting your privacy

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I can't stress enough the importance of your privacy. We never, ever release personal data about you. All data is completely anonymous and related to purchases only.

Nonsense. If you're not paying for the service your data is being monetized in a way that benefits the interests of the company providing the service, not you.


DHS Boss Calls For More Fear, Less Encryption

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Techdirt:

This is wonderful stuff if you're a fan of authoritarianism. Shut up and show your support. It's a message that's been sent several times by the new president. Now, it's being echoed by his top officials.

Yet another ill-considered power grab in the name of safety.

Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.


Don't like systematic privacy violations? Stop using the internet

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Ars Technica:

That's when Sensenbrenner said, "Nobody's got to use the Internet." He praised ISPs for "invest[ing] an awful lot of money in having almost universal service now." He then said, "I don't think it's my job to tell you that you cannot get advertising for your information being sold. My job, I think, is to tell you that you have the opportunity to do it, and then you take it upon yourself to make the choice."

We desperately need to stop electing officials that have no understanding of the impact of the legislation they help pass.


Silicon Valley fights to preserve net neutrality

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Recode:

"The internet industry is uniform in its belief that net neutrality preserves the consumer experience, competition and innovation online," the group said. "In other words, existing net neutrality rules should be enforced and kept intact."

I sincerely hope that net neutrality is preserved in its current form. Voluntary commitments from companies with the appalling track record shared by most ISPs are simply not going to be enough to preserve the internet freedoms we've become accustomed to.


Lawmakers want to require border agents to obtain a warrant for smartphone searches

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Recode:

"By requiring a warrant to search Americans' devices and prohibiting unreasonable delay, this bill makes sure that border agents are focused on criminals and terrorists instead of wasting their time thumbing through innocent Americans' personal photos and other data," [Sen. Ron] Wyden said in a statement.

I'd love to see this implemented, but I just can't see it happening.