Popular sites support long-shot effort to save net neutrality »

Wired:

The measure would still face long odds, however. Republicans, who tend to support the FCC’s move to repeal net neutrality, hold a solid majority in the House of Representatives. If it were to pass the House, the measure would also need the signature of President Trump or a two-thirds vote in both houses of Congress to override a veto.

I sincerely doubt that this effort will amount to anything, but it’s nice to see prominent companies and legislators continuing to fight in favor of net neutrality.

FCC strategically delays finalizing net neutrality repeal »

Jon Brodkin, Ars Technica:

Pai has been fond of saying that the net neutrality repeal hasn’t harmed consumers, but that’s a pretty low bar to clear given that the rules are still in effect.

If the rules were eliminated this week and ISPs began violating net neutrality while Congress is negotiating a permanent net neutrality law, it would be harder for Republicans to force Democrats to compromise, Feld said. “This has all been about trying to push Democrats to compromise and adopt weak legislation.”

This all reads like a textbook case of regulatory capture. Of course ISPs will abuse their market positions when this is repealed and they should have absolutely no input on net neutrality legislation.

Fortunately, states like California are leading the way with their own net neutrality laws, but that’s only if said laws manage to hold up to inevitable legal challenges of their own.

Generating Jekyll posts using Drafts and Working Copy »

I put together a script that will take a draft, grab the title and body and then prompt you for front matter data before sending the completed post off to Working Copy. It’s specific to my site, and purposes, but it should be fairly straightforward and easy to adapt to your needs.

When you first run the action, it’ll ask you for your repo name, posts path and Working Copy x-callback-url token. This info will be stored in Drafts and used to write out the correct file.

Site categories and tags are expected to be space delimited and are split out and mapped over to parse them into the proper format.

Post dates are pre-populated with the current date and that same date is combined with the draft file to generate the file name that’s specified when first running the action.

The FCC sucks at repealing net neutrality »

Karl Bode, techdirt:

… the FCC shot itself in the foot, and when it neutered its own authority over ISPs at Comcast, AT&T and Verizon’s behest, it managed to also neuter its authority to pre-empt states from filling the void. Of course this could all be moot if the FCC loses its battle in court, but it’s amusing all the same, and it’s another example of how Ajit Pai and friends didn’t really think this whole thing through.

FCC, ISPs grapple with net neutrality challenges

Jon Brodkin, Ars Technica:

Twelve lawsuits filed against the Federal Communications Commission over its net neutrality repeal have been consolidated into one suit that will be heard at a federal appeals court in California.

The 12 lawsuits were filed by more than three dozen entities, including state attorneys general, consumer advocacy groups, and tech companies.

Karl Bode, techdirt:

Granted having disparate state-level protections may in some ways be cumbersome, but that’s again something ISPs like AT&T, Verizon and Comcast should have thought a little harder about before killing extremely popular and modest (by international standards) federal protections. Large ISP lobbyists created this mess and, unsurprisingly, they’re simply refusing to own it.

I would’ve loved to see the FCC net neutrality repeal fail, but seeing proponents of the repeal grapple with the fallout of running roughshod over the public during the repeal process has been pretty satisfying. None of these ISPs appear to realize how unpopular they are and what they’re pushing for is. I want net neutrality enshrined in legislation, but any bill ISPs or their lobbyists are involved in writing would preserve net neutrality in name only.