Fort Collins votes in favor of municipal broadband »

Jon Brodkin, Ars Technica:

While the Federal Communications Commission has voted to eliminate the nation’s net neutrality rules, the municipal broadband network will be neutral and without data caps.

“The network will deliver a ‘net-neutral’ competitive unfettered data offering that does not impose caps or usage limits on one use of data over another (i.e., does not limit streaming or charge rates based on type of use),” a new planning document says. “All application providers (data, voice, video, cloud services) are equally able to provide their services, and consumers’ access to advanced data opens up the marketplace.”

I sincerely hope more cities push to create their own, neutral networks now that the FCC has abdicated its responsibility to protect consumers from abuses by private, monopolistic ISPs.

Responsible encryption »

Kurt Opsahl, The EFF:

The Department of Justice has said that they want to have an “adult conversation” about encryption. This is not it. The DOJ needs to understand that secure end-to-end encryption is a responsible security measure that helps protect people.

Ending net neutrality will end the Internet as we know it »

Steve Wozniak and Michael Copps:

The path forward is clear. The FCC must abandon its ill-conceived plan to end net neutrality. Instead of creating fast lanes for the few, it should be moving all of us to the fast lane by encouraging competition in local broadband connectivity and pushing companies to deliver higher speeds at more affordable prices. It’s the right thing for us as consumers and as citizens.

A vote for Pai is a vote against consumers and for Big Cable »

Sen. Ron Wyden:

Mr. Pai, has a long track record of putting big cable before consumers, big corporations above small businesses and pay-to-play over the free and open internet. Mr. Pai has betrayed the American consumer at every turn and has an agenda at the FCC that makes a mockery of the moniker: Independent Agency. He’s on the side of big cable and big business, and hasn’t done much of anything for the rest of us.

ISPs look to the Supreme Court to kill net neutrality »

Jon Brodkin, Ars Technica:

The lobby groups want a ruling that the FCC exceeded its statutory authority by reclassifying broadband as a common carrier service. Such a ruling could prevent future FCCs from implementing net neutrality rules as strict as the current ones, which outlaw blocking, throttling, and paid prioritization. A ruling for the industry could also prevent future FCCs from reviving other consumer protections that are likely to be overturned by the commission’s current Republican majority.

None of this would be necessary if ISPs and cable companies were capable of creating and providing services that consumers actually wanted to use. Instead, they pursue legal action to cripple competitors and force consumers to use their, at best, substandard services.